Nominations

The nomination period for the 2018 Representation Executive Council (REC) elections has closed. Stay tuned for more information about elections.

 

Important Dates

 

Nomination period: Monday, December 18, 2017 at 8:30pm until Wednesday, February 7, 2018 at 4:30pm

Elections information session: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 12:30pm – 1:30pm

All-candidates meeting: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at 12:30pm in Council Chambers

Campaigning: Sunday, March 11, 2018 at 12:00pm until Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at 5:00pm

Candidates’ debate: Tuesday, March 13, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Voting: Monday, March 12, 2018 at 10:00am until Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at 5:00pm. Voting will be online only.

If you have questions about the nomination and election process that aren’t answered here, feel free to email the CRO at elections@samru.ca.

 

Voting period: REC Elections 2018

Voting will be administered online through the SAMRU website. It will begin at 10:00am on Monday, March 12 and continue until at 5:00pm on Wednesday, March 14.

One in-person polling station will be available on Main Street during the following times:

Monday, March 12: 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Tuesday, March 13: 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Wednesday, March 14: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

 

Representation Executive Council Nominations

The four elected students who form the Representation Executive Council (REC) act in accordance with the wishes of the Student Governing Board and support the Board’s governance role. On a day-to-day basis, members of REC are primarily responsible for amplifying the student voice by representing students’ interests to the university, and by lobbying all three levels of government. The REC deals with issues like tuition and loan policies, governance, lobbying, academic appeals, and external relations.

Each REC member is an elected, full-time paid employee of the Students’ Association and must take one course per semester (excluding Spring and Summer), maintain a grade point average of at least 2.0, and keep full-time office hours. Students must be enrolled in full-time credit courses to be eligible to run for an executive position.

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What kind of skills can you gain as a representative?

Representation Executive Council members receive training and obtain skills through work experience in the following areas:

Representation: understand the roles and responsibilities of boards and of directors, representational roles, board/staff relations, goal setting, and fiduciary responsibilities.

Finance training: learn how to read operating reports, understand budgets and financial statements, and ask the right questions to ensure financial stewardship of the Students’ Association.

Legal and liability training: review ethics case studies, learn about organizational and officer liability, and understand the nuances of fiduciary or trustee responsibilities.

Robert’s Rules: chair meetings and briefings, participate in meetings, prepare for meetings, understand meeting procedures, partake in committee work, ensure that agendas are prepared, minutes and bylaws are reviewed and the work cycle is progressing.

Media training: understand the media, how to work with the media, interview preparation, and feedback.

Teambuilding: learn about cooperation, conflict resolution and communication, and create cohesive work groups.

Collaboration and self-discovery: learn about the work style colour energy that best describes you, how to collaborate with other work style types and tips for overcoming common conflicts in the workplace.

Organizational training: read content briefings on organizational history, understand staff roles and responsibilities, and operational and departmental functions.

Negotiation: develop skills with representation, lobbying and advocacy, to promote the best interests of students.

Policy development and analysis: work within a team to understand, develop and refine governance policies.

Leadership: understand and build confidence in yourself and others, set an example, represent others, take ownership, communicate effectively, persuade others, counsel, evaluate, and develop active listening skills.

Networking: engage in networking opportunities with professionals and other student leaders through committee work and professional conferences.

Time management: multi-tasking, scheduling, and work/life balance.

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Students’ Council Governor Nominations 

In the fall semester of each academic year, the Students’ Association seeks passionate and dedicated students to fill vacant Governor positions on Students’ Council. Collectively made up of student-elected Governors, Students’ Council is the highest decision-making body of SAMRU, and as such, Students’ Council is a policy-making board of directors for the Students’ Association. All Governors have a clearly defined governance role that focuses on the organization as a whole. Students’ Council has 18 seats. All members of Council, regardless of position, are entitled to a single vote at Students’ Council meetings.

In order to serve on Students’ Council, you must be a Mount Royal University Student enrolled in at least one credit course. Governors receive an honoraria for their committee work, but not for their governance work.

What kind of skills can you gain from being on Council?

Students’ Council Governors receive training and obtain skills through work experience in the following areas:

Governance: understand the roles and responsibilities of boards and of directors, representational roles, board/staff relations, goal setting, and fiduciary responsibilities.

Finance training: learn how to read operating reports, understand budgets and financial statements, and ask the right questions to ensure financial stewardship of the Students’ Association.

Robert’s Rules: chair meetings and briefings, participate in meetings, prepare for meetings, understand meeting procedures, partake in committee work, ensure that agendas are prepared, minutes and bylaws are reviewed and the work cycle is progressing.

Teambuilding: learn about cooperation, conflict resolution and communication, and create cohesive work groups.

Collaboration and self-discovery: learn about the work style colour energy that best describes you, how to collaborate with other work style types and tips for overcoming common conflicts in the workplace.

Leadership: understand and build confidence in yourself and others, set an example, represent others, take ownership, communicate effectively, persuade others, counsel, evaluate, and develop active listening skills.

Learn more about Governor roles and SAMRU committees.

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Contact

Governance Coordinator 
Phone: (403) 440-6405
Email: Governance